Mountain laurel in bloom

Mountain laurel in bloom
Mountain laurel is in bloom at West Rock, as seen on the Gold Trail.

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Naugatuck State Forest, West Block and East Block

Note: There is currently only one picture loaded on this page. There is a flaw in Blogspot. When I make a change to the opening page, it has now twice overriden this page. I copy and past the text from Word, but I have to input each picture manually. I will do that when I have reasonable certainty the error will not arise again.


While I have concentrated my trail maintenance efforts on West Rock Ridge State Park, my favorite place in New Haven County for hiking is the Naugatuck State Forest, West Block. There are actually five blocks or sections of the Naugatuck State Forest.



The nearest area to West Rock is the Mount Sanford Block at the border of Hamden, Cheshire, and Bethany. I describe this area on the page "Hikes Beyond West Rock."

The Quillinan Reservoir Block is located in Ansonia and Seymour, and is well worth hiking with miles of trails that have been improved by volunteers from the New England Mountain Biking Association and Thule Corporation. The multiple purple trails can be confusing, but the state declined my offer to have a better color plan. I describe this area on the page "Hikes Beyond West Rock."


Across the Route 313 is the Regional Water Authority’s Pine Hill Trails, which are open to those who purchase the RWA’s hiking permit. The White Trail at the Quillinan Reservoir connects to the adjacent Ansonia Nature Center property. Quillinan Reservoir map at http://www.ct.gov/deep/lib/deep/stateparks/maps/quillinanreservoir.pdf

 

The Great Hill Block is located in Seymour, but has maybe one mile of unblazed trails that do not connect to one another. This area is mainly intended for hunting. A hunting map of the area (which does not show any trails) is available at http://www.ct.gov/deep/lib/deep/wildlife/pdf_files/maps/maps_hunting_area/map333.pdf. The Forest Management Plan shows the trails on page 21 of the report: http://www.ct.gov/deep/lib/deep/forestry/management_plans/naugatuck_great_hill.pdf


The West Block and East Block are located on either side of Route 8 in the Beacon Falls and Naugatuck area with a section of the West Block located in Oxford. The West Block and East Block share some common natural features, including dramatic rock formations, streams, and a mixture of evergreen and hardwood woods, including hemlock forests.

The West Block also has a beautiful gorge with numerous cascades called Spruce Brook Gorge, plus four reservoirs, two waterfalls, and multiple overlooks of the Naugatuck River Valley.

Be aware that all blocks of the forest permit hunting, so be sure to wear blaze orange during hunting season. Hunting is not permitted on Sundays in Connecticut, so that day is always a safe choice for hiking. I encountered hunters while doing trail work in the West Block in fall 2015. Some had shotguns for quail, while others had bow and arrow or shotguns for deer. All were courteous people out enjoying the woods.

West Block map (showing the new trail colors): http://www.ct.gov/deep/lib/deep/stateparks/maps/naugatuckwestblock.pdf



Aubudon Connecticut published a 171 page report in February 2012 for the East Block and West Block called "Important Bird Area Conservation Plan". This comprehensive document has detailed information regarding the topography, geology, water, trees and shrubs, and wildlife, including birds, of course. This report may be downloaded at https://ct.audubon.org/sites/g/files/amh426/f/nsf_final_iba_plan.pdf.

The Audubon website provides an overview of why the organization designated these two blocks of the forest as an Important Bird Area: http://ct.audubon.org/conservation/naugatuck-state-forest.

The Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) has published a two page brochure called the Naugatuck State Forest Bird Checklist, which could be used by someone looking for particular species while in the forest: http://www.ct.gov/deep/lib/deep/forestry/nsf_bird_checklist.pdf.


The Naugatuck River flows through the forest, and the Naugatuck River Watershed Association is working to protect and enhance the river. Website: http://naugawatshed.org/index.htm

WFSB Channel 3 visits hiking areas and on May 13, 2016, posted a story with pictures about a visit to Spruce Brook Gorge (incorrectly called Spruce Brook Ravine in the story. Link: http://www.wfsb.com/story/31965786/fairy-tale-setting-for-connecticut-falls-attraction

High Rock Grove in the West Block was a popular place to spend the day at the turn of the 20th century. This article provides details about that experience: http://patch.com/connecticut/naugatuck/a-place-in-naugatuck-history-the-high-rock 


The city of Naugatuck is seeking to make trail connections between green spaces, which includes the state forest. An overview map of this plan was published by the Waterbury Republican American. This is a big file, so it may take time to load: http://blogs.rep-am.com/sidebar/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Wilmot-Open-Space-Overview-Grant-Map-Full-Trail-System12-2-2015_.pdf



Fall colors as viewed from the flag overlook on the Purple-Green Trail in the West Block of the Naugatuck State Forest.




East Block

The only marked trails in the East Block of the Naugatuck State Forest are the 5.5 mile Blue-Blazed Naugatuck Trail, the 0.8 mile Blue-White Whittemore Trail, and the Blue-Yellow 0.4 mile Beacon Cap Trail, all of which are managed by the Connecticut Forest and Park Association (CFPA). The 0.1-mile Blue-Red Spruce Knoll Trail was decommissioned by CFPA in 2015 as there is no longer a view from the knoll. There are also numerous unmarked woods roads, plus illegal trails created by ATV ruts. The Blue Trails are foot traffic only, while mountain bikes and horses may use the woods roads.

Naugatuck Trail information from the CFPA website: http://www.ctwoodlands.org/blue-blazed-hiking-trails/naugatuck-trail


This website has a review of the Naugatuck Trail: http://hikethegiant.blogspot.com/2011/05/naugatuck-trail.html
 

Egypt Brook is one of the highlights of the Naugatuck State Forest, East Block.



East Block Suggested Hikes

When I lead hikes in the East Block, I create loops using the Naugatuck Trail, the side trails, and the woods roads.

One loop starts at Veterans Memorial Park in Bethany and heads east following the path along the pond (Simpson Lake) before turning left onto a side trail at the end of the pond. This unmarked side trail leads to the start of the Naugatuck Trail on the north side of Route 42. Take the Naugatuck Trail west and be sure to divert over to the Beacon Cap Trail, which ends at Beacon Cap, an open rock face with a limited view to the east. From the Beacon Cap Trail, return to the Naugatuck Trail and continue west to the Whittemore Trail to return to Route 42. A short walk along Route 42 East brings you back to the park.

Veterans Memorial Park is a better location for parking than the trailheads on the Naugatuck or Whittemore Trails, which are small, dirt parking lots that are not easy to find if you do not know the area, and potentially muddy or icy in wet and cold weather conditions.



Interesting rock formations add interest to hikes in the Naugatuck State Forest, East Block. This formation is found along an unblazed woods road.



The other hike starts at the commuter parking lot on Cross Street in Naugatuck, which is a short distance away from the Naugatuck Trail trailhead on Andrasko Road. Head east along Route 8 and then turn left into the woods by Egypt Brook. I follow the Naugatuck Trail to the Whittemore Trail and turn left to head north past that trail and loop back along the woods roads. This can be difficult to follow if you do not know the area, so the safer choice is retracing your steps on the Naugatuck Trail.

The path of the former Spruce Knoll Trail can be followed to a woods road that eventually leads to the end of Andrasko Road in Beacon Falls, saving you from the noise of walking along Route 8 a second time. From the top of Spruce Knoll, descend the hill heading north, and then turn right on this unmarked woods road. Turning left from the base of Spruce Knoll leads to an overlook of the Naugatuck River Valley.

Disclaimer: Following any of these woods roads is entirely at your own risk, since they are not marked and are not always obvious.

The Naugatuck Trail is one of the milder Blue-Blazed trails with regard to difficulty, as it winds through the valley with gentle climbs and descents. This trail is good for hiking in all four seasons. The Whittemore Trail has similar characteristics. Many Blue Trails cross ridgelines with steep climbs and descents that require hikers to be in good shape. Some of these trails can be tricky in wet, snowy, and icy conditions due to their steepness. This is not the case for the Naugatuck Trail. The Beacon Cap Trail more closely matches the characteristics of some of these other trails, as it ascends several rock faces, which can be decidedly slippery in wet and icy conditions.



East Block parking areas

Both of these parking lots are large and can hold in excess of 30 cars, more than enough for most hiking groups.

Route 8, Exit 25 Park and Ride, 241 Cross St., Naugatuck.

Bethany Veterans Memorial Park, 265 Beacon Rd. (Rt. 42), Bethany

From Rt. 8 Exit 23, take Rt. 42 East for 4 miles. The park is on the right about ¾ of a mile past the Beacon Falls-Bethany border.





One of the many cascades along Spruce Brook makes the Blue Trail a highlight of the Naugatuck State Forest, West Block.



West Block

The West Block of the Naugatuck State Forest contains both woods roads and hiking trails. The woods roads in the central part of the property were created facilitate logging, while those along the reservoirs were used as access roads when the water company owned the property.

All trails are open to mountain bikes and horses, although some of the woods roads are too eroded for comfortable use by either mode of transportation.

The area was formerly a confusing maze of woods roads and trails, but that situation dramatically improved when I received state permission to blaze the trails, a project that took place from Sept. 2015 to April 2016. The forest now has nearly 20 miles of blazed woods roads and trails. I left some woods roads unblazed, but they are fairly obvious due to all the other blazing.

The reservoirs are popular for fishing (including ice fishing). Canoes and kayaks are permitted on the reservoirs, but the portage from the parking lots could be a challenge. Swimming is strictly prohibited in the reservoirs.



The Red-Green Trail at the junction with the Red Trail by Reservoir 2 shows the typical appearance of these woods roads.



West Block Trail Color Scheme

The basic color scheme for the forest is that the main woods roads on the western side of the forest are blazed Red. The two trails to the east of those woods roads are blazed Red-White to indicate these trails are spur trails off the main Red Trails. The spur trails to the west of the Red Trail are blazed Red-Yellow and Red-Green.

Randomly within the mix is the Teal Trail that runs along the south and east sides of Reservoir 4 and the Beige Trail that runs along the east side of Reservoir 3. There is an unmarked, washed out trail north on the west side of the Red Trail north of Reservoir 4 that leads to a small waterfall. The trail does not extend past the waterfall, so users need to backtrack to the Red Trail to continue their hike.

The main trails and woods roads along the eastern side of the forest are blazed Purple. There is a Purple-White and Purple-Yellow Trail on woods roads that connect Purple to other trails. The colors along the woods road that is blazed Purple-Yellow changes at the southern end to Purple as the Purple Trail merges from the east. There is a brief Purple-Green Trail near the northern end of the Purple Trail that leads to the Flag Overlook, which offers excellent views of the Naugatuck River Valley.

Other trail colors off Purple include the Green and Orange Trails, which are woods roads, and the White Trail that is a narrow footpath. The Orange Trail parallels the top of Spruce Brook Gorge.

The narrow, uneven trail through Spruce Brook Gorge is blazed Blue. This trail has uncertain footing in spots, and is best avoided in wet and icy conditions. This trail ends at its western end by a large waterfall on the White blazed woods road.

The woods road across this section of the forest is blazed White. There is no physical connection between the woods road and the trail that is blazed white.





The White Trail north of Spruce Brook Road ends at this overlook of the Naugatuck State Forest's East Block.



North of Spruce Brook Road, some colors are reused on a variety of footpaths and woods roads. None of these trails have any physical connection to the trails south of Spruce Brook Road, although the White Trail and the White-blazed woods road come within 0.2 miles of each other.

The overlook off the Red-Orange Trail is an excellent one with views to the south. The overlook off the White Trail has more limited views.



With all these trails the property offers multiple options for hiking. The highlight for most people is the three-quarter mile long hike through Spruce Brook Gorge (misnamed by people who thought the hemlocks lining the gorge were spruce trees).

This hike is usually accessed by people parking at the Big Rock parking lot (which earns its nickname from the large boulder in the parking lot) at the end of Cold Spring Road. At the end of the gorge, one option is to turn left and head up to the Flag Overlook, so named due to the American flag located on pole at an overlook with an excellent view of the Naugatuck River Valley.



Another popular hike is to park at the Old Litchfield Turnpike parking area, at the corner of Route 42, or the Chestnut Tree Hill Road parking area by the power lines, and hike along the reservoirs. This is particularly popular with dog walkers.



The Purple Trail passes through a ravine near the Green Trail. This is one of many scenic spots in the Naugatuck State Forest, West Block.



Trails South of Spruce Brook Road, Trail Characteristics

Most of the trails south of Spruce Brook Road are wide woods roads with good footing. The general orientation of the forest is that as you head north, the trails go uphill. The Purple Trail between the Purple-Yellow Trail is a mixture of woods roads and narrow footpaths. From the Flag Overlook, just past the White Trail, the Purple Trail is a very steep descent to the Orange Trail. I recommend using the White Trail as a safer alternative, especially in wet and icy conditions.

The White Trail between the Purple Trail and the Orange Trail is a footpath that winds up and around various rock formations. Near the Orange Trail, the White Trail has a sharp descent to the Orange Trail. The Red Trail from the base of Reservoir 1 to the Purple Trail is a footpath.

The Blue Trail through Spruce Brook Gorge is uneven with uncertain footing in places due to erosion, and has a couple of short rock scrambles. I recommend not using this trail in wet or icy conditions, due to the risk of falling. The alternative is walking up Spruce Brook Road to the White blazed woods road.



Trails North of Spruce Brook Road

This metal marker shows the way along the Red Trail North of Spruce Brook Road.

There is an additional set of trails north of the paved Spruce Brook Road (also known as Black Forest Road). The Red Trail from Spruce Brook Road is steep with several extended rock faces that offer limited footing. This trail is best hiked only from Spruce Brook Road, rather than trying to descend to the road. I recommend NOT using this trail in wet or icy conditions. The Red Trail is marked with metal disks and paint. Due to the steep terrain, it was not possible to create a switchback trail to soften the ascent. When coming from this area, it is best to descend on the White Trail where volunteers were able to create switchbacks around the rock faces, or on the gravel road from the powerlines.



This is one of four rock faces that make for a challenging climb on the Red Trail north of Spruce Brook Road.



The White Trail north of Spruce Brook Road has a winding ascent from the road that levels off when it reaches the Orange Trail. From the Orange Trail to the overlook of Route 8, the White Trail has gentle changes in grade. The Orange Trail and the Yellow Trail stay on top of the hills, so they have moderate changes in elevation. The Orange Trail connects to the powerlines at the northern end. While they are not official trails and they are not marked, the woods roads under the powerlines are obvious. The Yellow Trall cuts across the powerlines and links to Old Highway.

There is no trail connecting the overlook on the Red-Orange Trail to the overlook on the White Trail because the terrain between is steep and unsuitable for trails. 



The overlook on the Red-Orange Trail north of Spruce Brook Road offers a good perspective of the Naugatuck River Valley south toward the Flag Overlook on the Purple-Green Trail.


In the center of the West Block is High Rock Shooting Range, located on Spruce Brook Road. The firing range can be quiet loud on weekends, and the noise is unsettling to some hikers who hear gunshots in the woods and wonder if they are at risk of being hit. Rest assured that while the noise may be bothersome, the range is safe as they are firing at targets with a hill behind them. There are no trails near the back of the range and there are signs warning people when they are getting too close along the side. Website: http://www.highrockrange.com/



The High Rock Shooting Range is located on Spruce Brook Road.



The range and the forest inadvertently became part of history when terrorists were found to be using both locations during the 1990s. The Hartford Courant has these articles on the topic.







West Block Parking Areas, west side

Thanks to an expansion in spring 2016, there is a decent-sized parking lot holding about 20 cars at 360 Chestnut Tree Hill Rd., Oxford, at the southwest corner of Reservoir 4. There are also a few spots along the road by the powerlines.

Directions:

Rt. 8 North to Exit 23. Left at end of ramp to Rt. 42 West for 2.1 miles. Right on Chestnut Tree Hill Rd. for 1 mile. The parking area is on the right just past the powerlines.

Rt. 8 South to Exit 24. Right onto S. Main St. (becomes Rt. 42 West) for 3.1 miles. Right on Chestnut Tree Hill Rd. for 1 mile. The parking area is on the right just past the powerlines.



There is a small parking area holding about 10 cars at 1 Old Litchfield Tpke., Oxford, corner of Rt. 42, near Reservoirs 1 and 2. This parking area is popular, so it is often nearly full with cars. Cars may park along the road past the parking area, just be careful not to block any driveways.

Directions:

Rt. 8 North to Exit 23. Left at end of ramp to Rt. 42 West for 1.6 miles. Old Litchfield Tpke. is a slight right turn about 1/3 mile past Oxford town line.

Rt. 8 South to Exit 24. Right onto S. Main St. (becomes Rt. 42 West) for 2.6 miles. Old Litchfield Tpke. is a slight right turn about 1/3 mile past Oxford town line.



There is a large parking lot holding about 20 cars at an approximate address of 700 Hunters Mountain Road, Naugatuck, at the northwest corner of the forest. The nearest house is half mile east of this lot and is numbered 300 Hunters Mountain Road, so keep that other number in mind if you are using GPS or a mapping program that does not recognize 700 Hunters Mountain Road. If you use this lot, keep in mind that the forest elevations tend to rise as you head north, so parking here means an uphill walk on the way back. Finding this lot confusing as you wind through the streets of Naugatuck and end with a super steep climb up Hunters Mountain Road that will challenge your engine.

Directions:

Route 8 North to Exit 26. Left on Route 63 North for 0.4 miles. Bear left on Scott Street for 0.1 miles. Left on Lewis Street for 0.5 miles. Bear left on Hunters Mountain Road for 1.5 miles. The parking lot is at the end of the road.

Note: Coming from Route 8 North, you can save 3 miles by getting off at Exit 23 and taking Route 42 to Cold Spring Road, but trust me, you don’t want to do that. Cold Spring Road (as indicated in the directions for the Big Rock parking lot) is a bumpy, rutted dirt road, and is not plowed in the winter.

Route 8 South to Exit 26. Right on Route 63 North for 0.3 miles. Bear left on Scott Street for 0.1 miles. Left on Lewis Street for 0.5 miles. Bear left on Hunters Mountain Road for 1.5 miles. The parking lot is at the end of the road.





The Flag Overlook on the Purple-Green Trail is a popular destination in the Naugatuck State Forest, West Block.



West Block parking areas, east side

If you are leading a group hike and plan to hike Spruce Brook Gorge, which is accessed from the Big Rock parking lot, I HIGHLY recommend meeting at the Beacon Falls Railroad Station, 1 Railroad Avenue, Beacon Falls, and doing a carpool/car caravan over to the parking lot.

The northern section of Cold Spring Road is a 1.2-mile dirt road, typically full of 6-inch deep craters (sometimes filled with water) and lots of loose rocks. Much of the dirt section is a single car length wide and all of it is directly next to the Metro North Waterbury line. People who have not been there before will likely think they made a wrong turn, i.e., “This can’t possibly be the right way!” The road is not plowed in the winter.

The Big Rock parking lot gets its nickname from the large boulder along one side of the lot. There are no signs indicating you are in the Naugatuck State Forest, but you are.

Directions:

Rt. 8 North to Exit 23. Right on S. Main St. (briefly Route 42 West). Left at the second light on Depot St. and go over the green metal bridge. Left on Railroad Ave. The train station is on the right.

Rt. 8 South to Exit 24. Right on S. Main St. Right on Depot St. and go over the green metal bridge. Left on Railroad Ave. The train station is on the right.



From the train station, turn left on Railroad Ave. and go over the concrete bridge. Turn right on Lopus Road. At the next intersection, continue straight where the road name changes to Cold Spring Road (sometimes called High Rock Road). As you pass through the gate, the road becomes dirt for 1.2 miles. The road splits and bear left up a slight hill into the parking area. Park by the large rock.

Mapping programs may see the trailhead as 290 Cold Spring(s) Rd. or 290 High Rock Rd., Beacon Falls.





Cold Spring Road squeezes between a rock formation and the guardrail with the Metro North Railroad Tracks along the right.



To reach the Big Rock parking area, bear left at this split on Cold Spring Road. Continuing straight leads to the parking area on Spruce Brook Road.



This small sign at the entrance to the Big Rock parking lot is the only indication this is state property.



The Big Rock to the left gives this parking lot its unofficial nickname.



If you are headed directly to the Big Rock parking lot, here are the directions:

Directions:

Rt. 8 North to Exit 23. Right on S. Main St. (briefly Route 42 West). Left at the second light on Depot St. and go over the green metal bridge. Right on Railroad Ave. and go over the concrete bridge. Turn right on Lopus Road. At the next intersection, continue straight where the road name changes to Cold Spring Road (sometimes called High Rock Road). As you pass through the gate, the road becomes dirt for 1.2 miles. The road splits and bear left up a slight hill into the parking area. Park by the large rock.

Rt. 8 South to Exit 24. Right on S. Main St. Right on Depot St. and go over the green metal bridge. Right on Railroad Ave. and go over the concrete bridge. Turn right on Lopus Road. At the next intersection, continue straight where the road name changes to Cold Spring Road (sometimes called High Rock Road). As you pass through the gate, the road becomes dirt for 1.2 miles. The road splits and bear left up a slight hill into the parking area. Park by the large rock.



There is a second parking lot on Spruce Brook Road, just past the junction of Cold Spring Road. This would involve staying straight on Cold Spring Road, instead of bearing left into the Big Rock parking lot. This lot also holds about 20 cars, but is not the recommended choice. From the split in the road, Cold Spring Road is a sharp, rocky descent to Spruce Brook Road.



There are a few small pull-offs holding 2 to 4 cars along Spruce Brook Road, which is a paved road. This road is best accessed from Hunters Mountain Road, sparing car and driver alike the challenge of driving along Cold Spring Road. There is a gate on Spruce Brook Road near Cold Spring Road and another near the High Rock Shooting Range that are potentially locked in winter, as Cold Spring Road is not paved.



 

Ice fishermen on Reservoir 4 in winter.


Indie Movie Filmed at West Block, Reservoir 2

An indie horror movie called Beneath, released in 2013, was filmed at Reservoir 2, and adds another entry to the dubious category of clueless teens who are stalked by an uncertain menace that kills them, in this case a person-eating fish. For the purposes of the movie, they are stuck in a leaky rowboat, unable to get to shore after the fish has taken their only oar. The official website is http://www.beneaththewater.com/about

The movie rates 3.8 out of 10 on the Internet Movie Database, which is one of the lowest scoring movies on the website. I viewed the trailer and that was more than enough. I have no desire to see the movie. Website: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2325518/

Wikipedia has a summary of the movie, plus comments from critics savaging it. Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beneath_(2013_film)


Naugatuck State Forest, West Block:

List of Trails and Mileage


Distance
Trail Color(s)
Trail Location
Miles

Blazed trails and woods roads SW of Spruce Brook Road
3.1
Red
The west side of the forest from Hunter Mtn. Rd. south to the Purple Trail east of Reservoir 1
1.6

Red-White
Two sections: the northern section from the White woods road south to the Red Trail east of Reservoir 4.
The southern section extends from the Red Trail in the northwest corner of Reservoir 2 and heads south along the east side of Reservoirs 1 and 2 to the Red Trail
Each section is 0.8 miles long.
1.2
Red-Green
From the Red Trail east of Reservoir 4 southwest to the Red Trail west of Reservoir 2
0.3
Red-Yellow
From the Red Trail west of Reservoir 2 south to the Red-Green Trail east of Reservoir 3
1.4
White
A woods road starting at the Red Trail near the powerlines and heading west with a horseshoe turn by the Red-White Trail. Past the horseshoe turn it connects with three woods roads and ends at the paved Spruce Brook Rd.
0.6
Green
From the White woods road south to the Purple Trail, just west of High Rock
0.7
Orange
From the Green woods road southeast to the big rock parking lot
0.7
Blue
From the White woods road southeast through the gorge to the big rock parking lot.
0.4
White
From the Orange Trail southeast over High Rock to the Purple Trail just west of the flag overlook
0.55
Teal
From the Chestnut Tree Hill Rd. parking lot east along the base of Reservoir 4 and then north along the east side of Reservoir 4 to the Red Trail
0.45
Beige
From the Teal Trail at the Res. 4 dam to the Red-Green Tr. at the Res. 3 dam.
3.0
Purple
From the Orange Trail near the Big Rock parking area and flag overlook southwest to the Red Trail east of Reservoir 1
0.4
Purple-Yellow
From the White woods road south to the Purple Trail
0.3
Purple-White
A short connector trail between the Purple Trail and the Red-White Trail east of Reservoir 4.
0.05
Purple-Green
A brief connector trail to guide people from the Purple Trail to the flag overlook.
14.85
Subtotal
Blazed trails and woods roads SW of Spruce Brook Road





Unblazed trails and woods roads SW of Spruce Brook Rd.
0.7
Unblazed
Gravel section of Hunters Mountain Road, between the two paved sections, running south toward Chestnut Tree Hill Rd.
0.5
Unblazed
Grassy woods road running roughly west east from the Red-blazed gravel road, 0.35 miles south of Hunters Mountain Road to Spruce Brook Road.
0.5
Unblazed
Gravel logging road running north south from the White gravel road to the Purple Trail, sandwiched between the Purple-Yellow gravel road and the Green gravel road
0.35
Unblazed
Woods road connecting Hunters Mountain Road to the grassy path that runs west-east from the Red-blazed gravel road to Spuce Brook Road.
0.35
Unblazed
Gravel extension of Old Litchfield Tpke. from the cul-de-sac north of Sheldon Drive to the junction with Chestnut Tree Hill Rd.
0.15
Unblazed
Woods road from the Old Litchfield Tpke. parking area to the Red Trail by Reservoir 2.
0.15
Unblazed
Trail to Surprise Falls from Red Trail
2.70
Subtotal
Unblazed trails and woods roads SW of Spruce Brook Rd.



17.55
Subtotal
All woods roads and trails, SW of Spruce Brook Road





Woods roads and trails northeast of Spruce Brook Road
1.2
Yellow
From the Old Highway south and west to the White Trail
1.0
White
From the Spruce Brook Road east to the overlook
0.7
Orange
From the powerlines southeast, briefly overlapping the White Trail, then joining the Red Trail to an overlook
0.4
Red
From Spruce Brook Road west, then south joining the Orange Trail to the overlook
3.3
Subtotal
Blazed trails
0.7
Powerline Access Road
From the powerlines south to Spruce Brook Road
0.7
Unblazed
Woods road from Hunter Mountain Road south to Spruce Brook Road
4.6
Subtotal
Woods roads and trails northeast of Spruce Brook Road



20.95

Woods roads and trails in the Naug. State Forest West



Roads and Powerlines (mileage reflects only those sections within the forest)

Distance
Surface
Name or Area
1.4
Paved
Spruce Brook Road
0.8
Paved
Hunters Mountain Road
0.4
Paved
Cold Springs Road
2.4
Gravel
Powerline cut from the west side of Res. 4 north and west to Sugar Bush Brook in the forest’s northeast corner, ending at Cherry Street Extension in Naugatuck
0.8
Gravel
Powerline cut south of Reservoir 4, extending west and south to Cold Springs Road at Lopus Road Extension
5.8
Total
Roads and powerline cuts



The forest is 2.9 miles north to south. The forest is 2 mile wide at its widest point in the northern section and narrows to 0.5 miles wide at its southern end.


3 comments:

  1. i ran into you marking trails while hiking with my toddler- very exciting to see someone marking and mapping the trails here! i've been hiking the western block for about 15 years, exploring many of the seemingly random trails, but have been sticking to the gravel logging road now that i have kids for the reason you stated- too easy to get lost on all the other trails. I'm looking forward to exploring them again with your map, thanks for taking on this!!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Who is marking the trails? I grew up trespassing onto the water company land, so this is my backyard. Hiking here for over 30 years. The markings are very nicely and professionally done. Just curious who is responsible.

    ReplyDelete
  3. thank you for your hard work! The trails are great. Your map really opened up the options available. Your blog had some good tips in it. Sorry that it is gone. We really enjoyed both waterfalls and wouldn't have found them without your blog!

    ReplyDelete